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The Echo Chamber May 25, 2011

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For every atheist that speaks out, there is often a reciprocal event taking place that may be going unnoticed. It is often the case that most of the people surrounding atheists have never been exposed to the arguments offered up for atheism. We can never really expect that others will see the clarity of rational thought just by hearing our words alone, but we can expect that individual atheists are interrupting the believer’s continuous loop of positive religious feedback. If enough of us atheists choose to break through to the believer’s religious echo chamber, we can create a tapestry of negative feedback. Working as a wall of reason to challenge every public display of religion, atheists may be able to turn the tides against the absurdly favored perception of religion. We know without a doubt that religion is the wrong path for humanity and being free from it’s grasp, we are able to clearly see as no others that it is an inherently dangerous worldview. It appears that it is only a matter us working harder to become the collective force that is capable of finishing off the old irrational beast. Much like the child that is surrounded by people consistently telling them that lying is wrong, the chances that our message will be heard increases every time an atheist speaks up. In my opinion, the power of the individual outspoken atheist cannot be stated enough.

Alone, we will nearly always fail against the great ocean of rational illiteracy and religious lunacy. When we speak alone, it’s likely much easier for the religious world to write us off as kooks, but together we may be able to break down even the most indoctrinated Religionist. The flaw in all of this is that there are many atheists that perceive that they have too much to lose in speaking out. I must ask though, at what point do atheists choose to suffer for the cause? For me, it was knowing that I couldn’t suffer the loss of employment.

What assurances would you need before you would be willing to go public? What would make you comfortable enough to speak out? Would you speak up if your government began embracing theocracy?

Religion Must Go: Why Accomodationism Fails. March 22, 2011

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“The Christian resolution to find the world ugly and bad has made the world ugly and bad.” – Friederich Nietzsche

I won’t pretend that the following examples are fully representative of the current status between atheists and their religious opponents, though it could be argued that at one time or another these relationships have turned out pretty fucking bad for atheists. Religion, by it’s very nature, is an enemy to reason and thus an enemy to atheism. There are striking resemblances in the relationships of atheists and religionists to those of the Nazis and Jews, African Americans and the KKK, Islamic extremists and freedom, and Eminem and Vanilla Ice. I can say with reasonable certainty that none of the above named groups will ever be capable of buddying up for any extended period of time.

“I am myself a dissenter from all known religions, and I hope that every kind of religious belief will die out.” – Bertrand Russell

It is a matter of fact that certain groups of people are inherently in opposition to one another. Because the beliefs and values of these oppositional groups are so far divided, these groups will never be able to find a middle ground to work with. When I say that these groups will never be able to find middle ground, I’m speaking of the groups as a whole and not subsets or individuals in these groups. I know that it very common for individuals to set aside their differences, but I can’t imagine, under any circumstances, that the KKK is going to begin allowing African Americans in as members. I also can’t imagine that Christianity, or Islam for that matter, is capable of changing it’s stance on homosexuals, women’s rights, and atheists. Neither religion currently has the capability to edit out the hate filled verses aimed at these groups. I don’t know about you, but I’m not comfortable with accommodating a groups that feels that I should either be killed, shunned, or burning in Hell.

“Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration–courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and, above all, love of the truth.”- H. L. Mencken

At this point, I’m not here to argue about who is right and who is wrong, I am simply trying to show that religion, as a whole, is incompatible with atheism. I say this, as I know that many people on both sides are wishing for a future where all sides are walking hand in hand. I fully admit that I often desire this outcome too, it’s just that it may never be possible. Even if I feel that it is highly unlikely, I can still hope right? Even though I admit that I don’t believe that there is chance for hand in hand cooperation, I am by no means calling for an end to the efforts and I am in no way saying our battle should ever resort to violence. What I do feel, much like Reagan’s stance on not negotiating with terrorists, is that atheists everywhere should be focusing more of their time on efforts that reduce religion’s power and sway. I’m not claiming to know what strategies work, but I can reason out that finding common ground is only going to take us so far. Even if atheism was able to mesh with religion, history has shown us that it will only be a matter of time before religion takes a new fanatical turn and we are again victimized by it’s violent dogmatic irrationality.

An unrelated, but awesome quote: “Imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, ‘This is an interesting world I find my self in – an interesting hole I find my self in – fits me rather neatly, doesn’t it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!’ This is such a powerful idea that as the sun rises in the sky and the air heats up and as, gradually, the puddle gets smaller and smaller, it’s still frantically hanging on to the notion that everything’s going to be alright, because this world was meant to have him in it, was built to have him in it; so the moment he disappears catches him rather by surprise. I think this may be something we need to be on the watch out for.”
– Douglass Adams

The twisting mind. March 16, 2011

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“Philosophy is questions that may never be answered. Religion is answers that may never be questioned” – Anonymous

Many claim that faith is a virtue. Many also claim that having faith is difficult to attain. If these statements were in fact true, why is it something that one month old can learn and why is it so difficult for man to live with such uncertainty? From a very early age, children learn to have faith in many things. Most children quickly learn to have faith in their parents, their enviornment, and their own body. It is through faith that children are able to comfort themselves in times of stress and need. Faith is so engrained into us that it becomes our default position. Faith is not in any way a skill. It is not considered a skill when we are good about trusting the sun to come up. It is however considered a skill when someone is able to figure out how and why the sun comes up.

Those of us that cannot seem to live without 100% faith, resort to religion when questions become too complex. If faith is easy, then religion is too. Religion is nothing more than the easy way out of complex questions. Religion is what happens when man desires answers, figures out that the some questions may be unanswerable, and decides to just give up on the quest for truth.

To not have faith and to be okay with not knowing is a skill far beyond that of faith. We are not, at any point in our infancy, taught to just be okay with things. For theists to propose that God must exist simply because they believe that nothing could ever come from nothing is the most extreme form of faith, for the theist also believes that there God came from nothing.

I have no idea about how we got here and I am certain that neither do theists. The biggest difference is that they cannot accept uncertainty. They would believe some of the most absurd things just to escape the uneasy feeling of the unknown. They would claim the existence of an always present invisible being before looking to the sky and proclaiming that maybe reality has always just been or at the very least proclaiming that maybe we will just never know. The thing that theists can never seem to get is that, just because atheists don’t have all the answers, they don’t get to fill in all of our gaps in knowledge with unfounded absurdities.

“To really be free, You need to be free in the mind” – Alexander Loutsis